I’ve always collected things or their constituent parts, treating them as raw material for my sculptural work. Sometimes mysterious in origin or purpose, sometimes more obvious, these bits and pieces tend to spur me on creatively. Added handmade components bring the sculptures to completion—including carved, welded, painted and otherwise constructed bits. In the work, I attempt a union between the humorous and the dark, which represents my own outlook on life. Using the influence of Southern folk art as a springboard, my work often approaches the absurd and sometimes the surreal. In incorporating found, “dirty” materials, the grittiness of the work neutralizes its playfulness. My artwork rarely draws conclusions or edifies—I find posing questions more satisfying.

My blue-collar parents provided me with a strong work ethic and an obsessive relationship with time. As an only child, lots of my hours were spent alone. Reinforced in solitude by social awkwardness, imagination became a loyal friend. Later education (art school in the “big city”) had more of a social than a creative effect on me. What was needed then was confirmation as an artist and a person, more than art instruction or discipline. I moved into Manhattan after graduation. Living in the city for twenty-plus years developed me somewhat creatively—but I found being in an art “ghetto”, with its social and artistic values, to be limiting. Upon leaving the city, I found new freedom and direction. My present work stems from that move.